• tags: army, social_media, social_networking, Military

    • The U.S. Army wants you – to be its friend on Facebook.

      You can also follow the Army on Twitter. Or post a comment on its new blog. They’re all part of the Army’s new mission: social networking.

      “If Ashton Kutcher can do it, the U.S. Army can do it,” said Lindy Kyzer, who posts the Army’s “status updates” on Facebook and “tweets” on Twitter.

    • The U.S. Army wants you – to be its friend on Facebook.

      You can also follow the Army on Twitter. Or post a comment on its new blog. They’re all part of the Army’s new mission: social networking.

      “If Ashton Kutcher can do it, the U.S. Army can do it,” said Lindy Kyzer, who posts the Army’s “status updates” on Facebook and “tweets” on Twitter.

    • Even Gen. Ray Odierno, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, is on Facebook. With nearly 5,000 “friends,” the four-star general is updating his status straight from the battlefield – something unheard of in past conflicts.

      Gen. Michael Oates, commander of the 10th Mountain Division based at Fort Drum, N.Y., has been blogging from Iraq for months.

    • The Facebook and Twitter messages are really an extension of the press releases and stories that Army officials put out through the Division of Public Affairs. But it’s also a place for soldiers and their families to connect.
      • Correct…at least on the first part anyway. I’m seeing a lot of re-broadcasting of public affairs materials. Some services are better than others in this regard–i.e. more engagement, less re-broadcast. – post by TransTracker
    • The Army’s not alone. The Air Force is on Twitter and the Coast Guard is on Facebook.
      • The Coast Guard is also on Twitter, and they are one of the worst re-broadcast offenders. – post by TransTracker
  • tags: social_media, Military, MilBlogging, social_networking

    • The Army announced the other day that it would get a million or more followers on micro-messaging site Twitter, just like “Punk’d” host and social networking superstar Ashton Kutcher. But catching to Mr. Demi won’t be easy — since many Army bases block Twitter on its networks.

      It’s the latest example of the military’s schizophrenic relationship with social media.

  • tags: cyberwar

    • Georgian officials believed it was an effort by Russia to apply psychological pressure on the country and cause some disruption, “but not to the extent that the whole banking system would have been shut off, crippling the economy,” says Tkeshelashvili.

      But that’s exactly what happened. As armed hostilities began, the distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks increased in severity, making news and government Web sites impossible to reach. Banks shut down servers to protect themselves from the theft of data, but a flood of false information and erroneous IP packets presumably originated in Russia triggered an automated response from international banks to sever connections to the country.

      By itself, the DDoS attack was shutting down Georgia’s ability to reach the world, but the problem was compounded by the reaction to the attack from financial institutions. Combined, these actions had one result: The Russians had succeeded in isolating Georgia.

    • But this attack was intended “to make sure that the outside world couldn’t see into Georgia and make sure Georgia couldn’t get in touch with the outside world,” says Tom Merilo, a retired information systems auditor from Canada’s largest telecom, Bell, who was in Georgia after the war to help with technical efforts to improve the networks.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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